The Class Action Fairness Act of 2000
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The Class Action Fairness Act of 2000 report together with additional and minority views (to accompany S. 353). by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary

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Published by U.S. G.P.O. in [Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Class actions (Civil procedure) -- United States,
  • Removal of causes

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesReport / 106th Congress, 2d session, Senate -- 106-420.
The Physical Object
Pagination67 p. ;
Number of Pages67
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17596951M
OCLC/WorldCa45367959

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  Class action lawsuits can get confusing. Sometimes they’re dealt with in state courts. Sometimes they’re dealt with in federal court. Which one they go to is largely determined by the Class Action Fairness Act (CAFA).. The Class Action Fairness Act now allows for the reduction of attorneys’ fees.   S. (th). A bill to provide for class action reform, and for other purposes. In , a database of bills in the U.S. Congress. The U.S. Class Action Fairness Act of , 28 U.S.C. Sections (d), , and –, expanded subject-matter jurisdiction over many large class-action lawsuits and mass actions taken in the United States.. The bill was the first major piece of legislation of the second term of the Bush Administration. Business groups and tort reform supporters had lobbied for the Enacted by: the th United States Congress. Congress passed the Class Action Fairness Act (CAFA) in to address a series of well-documented abuses of the class action process. Among the protections of the act were provisions enabling class action defendants to remove class action cases more readily than had been allowed before. 28 U.S.C. § (d).

  The Class Action Fairness Act, also called CAFA, is a United States' law that was enacted in to move many class-action lawsuits from under the jurisdiction of state courts to federal courts. Proponents of the act argued that cases would be fairer under federal courts, where cases could be judged on a national standard rather than by the mixed bag of state courts. Earlier today, the Tenth Circuit joined the majority of Circuit Courts of Appeals in holding that a plaintiff cannot conclusively avoid federal removal jurisdiction under the Class Action Fairness Act of (CAFA) by including in the complaint a statement of intention not to seek more than $4,, in damages on behalf of the putative class.   Mar 9, H.R. (th). To amend the procedures used in Federal court class actions and multidistrict litigation proceedings to assure fairer, more efficient outcomes for claimants and defendants, and for other purposes. In , a . Gregory C. Cook is chair of the Financial Services Litigation Practice Group at Balch & Bingham, L.L.P., where he has practiced since He served for three years as cochair of the ABA Class Action and Derivative Suits Committee and is currently chair of the Business Torts and Antitrust Section of the Alabama State : Paperback.

Get this from a library! The Class Action Fairness Act of report together with additional and minority views (to accompany S. ).. [United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on .   The Class Action Fairness Act (“CAFA”), 28 U.S.C. § (d)(2), confers federal subject matter removal jurisdiction over purported class actions filed in state court when, among other things, there is an amount-in-controversry (“AIC”) exceeding $5,, Deciding whether a class action can be properly removed under CAFA typically turns on whether this high . Class action defendants usually prefer to have their cases heard in federal court, where the protections of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23 apply and where courts and juries are less likely to disfavor an out-of-state business. And as every class action defense lawyer knows, the Class Action Fairness Act of (“CAFA”) puts a significant thumb on the scale in favor of having .   The Class Action Fairness Act of (CAFA) was intended to make it easier for defendants to remove class action lawsuits from state court to federal court. For example, CAFA introduced the concept of minimal as opposed to complete diversity, and waived the absolute one year deadline normally applicable to removal petitions as well as the.