Pain in older people
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Pain in older people

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Published by Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Pain in old age -- Handbooks, manuals, etc,
  • Pain -- therapy,
  • Aged,
  • Pain -- complications

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by Peter Crome, Chris J. Main, and Frank Lally.
GenreHandbooks, manuals, etc.
SeriesOxford pain management library
ContributionsCrome, Peter., Main, Chris J., Lally, Frank.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRB127 .P332265 2007
The Physical Object
Paginationp. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17884508M
ISBN 109780199212613
LC Control Number2007013666

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2 The assessment of pain in older people Pain is under-recognised and under-treated in older people. It is a subjective, personal experience, only known to the person who suffers. The assessment of pain is particularly challenging in the presence of severe cognitive impairment, communication difficulties or language and cultural Size: KB. Vaccine preventable illnesses and diseases continue to cause significant sickness, hospitalization, pain, disability, and death in the United States. Pneumonia causes somewhere between , and , hospitalizations in older adults each year, and more than 50% of flu-related hospitalizations are in people age 65 and older. Pain that lasts for 3 months or longer is called chronic pain. This pain often affects older people. For some people, chronic pain is caused by a health condition such as arthritis. It may also follow acute pain from an injury, surgery, or other health issue that has been . Get this from a library! Pain in older people. [Peter Crome; Chris J Main; Frank Lally;] -- Pain in older people is both common and disabling, and differs significantly in terms of its aetiology, diagnosis and treatment from pain in the general adult population. This pocketbook is a.

Pain in later life is both quite common and disabling, and it differs significantly in terms of its aetiology, diagnosis and treatment from pain in the general adult population. Older people often have complicated co-morbidities, have a high prevalence of mental health problems (e.g. anxiety, cognitive impairment, and depression) and respond to Format: Paperback.   Chronic pain is one of the most common conditions encountered by healthcare professionals, particularly among older (≥65 years) patients. 1 Pain is associated with substantial disability from reduced mobility, avoidance of activity, falls, depression and anxiety, sleep impairment, and isolation. 1 2 3 Its negative effects extend beyond the patient, to disrupt both family and social. The anatomy and physiology of pain --Relating socio-economic issues to older people and pain: independence, dignity and choice --'Creaking joints, a bit of arthritis, and aches and pains': older people's experiences and perceptions of pain --Assessment of pain --Communication and pain --Acute on chronic pain --Cancer pain in elderly people in. End Everyday Pain for 50+ presents a complete minute-a-day program to correct previous damage, develop healthier joints, and stay pain free at any age. This book’s step-by-step approach provides quick relief and lasting solutions by fixing your body’s alignment through simple stretching and s:

8 Pain in Older People Robert D. Helme and Stephen J. Gibson National Ageing Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia According to self-report measures, acute pain probably occurs at much the same rate across all age groups. Chronic pain is experienced more by older people, but this increase does not continue beyond the. Pain in later life is both quite common and disabling, and it differs significantly in terms of its aetiology, diagnosis and treatment from pain in the general adult population. Older people often have complicated co-morbidities, have a high prevalence of mental health problems (e.g. anxiety, cognitive impairment, and depression) and respond to. Pain can “attack” elderly people from a variety of sources. However, some causes are more common than others. For example, musculoskeletal conditions, such as arthritis, are the number one cause of pain among people over the age of Arthritis causes joints to become inflamed, leading to stiff, red, swollen and painful joints.   13 Ways to Fix Your Age-Related Back Pain. As your spine ages, you may start feeling some aches and pains. Degenerative changes in discs .